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MIDSA - MIcroencapsulated Diets for Sustainable Aquaculture
MIDSA - MIcroencapsulated Diets for Sustainable Aquaculture

MIDSA - MIcroencapsulated Diets for Sustainable Aquaculture

Developing a sustainable, economically viable feed for bivalve shellfish

This project builds on the previous edition of MIDSA project, and will conduct consumer evaluation studies as well as a commercial viability analysis.  

Bivalve shellfish aquaculture is highly attractive from a human nutrition, economic, environmental and ecosystem standpoint. However, industry growth for bivalve shellfish is falling behind that of fish aquaculture due to critical defects in the production process which are impacting production, including feed defects, disease, and quality issues.  

The MIDSA project has developed a highly nutritious bivalve feed product from microencapsulated particles which aims to increase hatchery production rates through the uplift in the quality of broodstock, higher survivorship and growth of juveniles.  

An important aspect to the project has involved sourcing the nutritional microencapsulated particles from waste streams, providing economic and sustainability benefits through a circular economy. 

From previous edition

"There is a global need to sustainably increase aquaculture production to meet the needs of a growing population. Bivalve shellfish aquaculture is highly attractive from a human nutrition, economic, environmental and ecosystem standpoint.

However, bivalve industry growth is falling behind fish aquaculture due to critical defects in the production process. Feed defects, disease, and quality issues are throttling production. We will develop a highly nutritious bivalve feed product, in the form of microencapsulated particles, and known as BioBullets. This feed will increase bivalve hatchery production rates through uplift in the quality of broodstock and higher survivorship and growth of juveniles. We have already demonstrated that our microencapsulates can be ingested by a commercially farmed bivalve, the blue mussel Mytilus edulis. This project will source nutritional encapsulates from waste streams, providing economic and sustainability benefits through a circular economy."

Partners

The following partners are involved in the project

AZTI
University of Cambridge

Project Lead

David Aldridge
Institution

University of Cambridge

Contact details

da113@cam.ac.uk

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