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How Food is Made? Understanding Food Processing Technologies

How Food is Made? Understanding Food Processing Technologies

Have you ever wondered how your food is processed before it reaches your plate? Find out with this online course.

The course focuses on:

  • The history of food processing – why it emerged and why it is important;
  • Examples of the major traditional and more advanced food processing technologies and the products they affect;
  • Consideration of the advantages and disadvantages of specific food processing technologies, their impact on health, safety, quality and sustainability; and
  • How EU law keeps the consumer safe and healthy and food on the supermarket shelves

Who should join the course

This course is for anyone interested in learning more about the food they eat.

Timeline

The course will have multiple runs in 2020 and 2021.  

Learning objectives and outcomes

Once completed, participants will be able to:

  • Explore the principles of food processing and gain an understanding of both traditional and modern industrial techniques;
  • Justify the importance of food processing to society in terms of health, safety, quality and sustainability;
  • Engage with the debate on how beneficial certain processing techniques are to human health;
  • Evaluate EU law and regulations;
  • Reflect on the challenges of feeding growing populations safely and sustainably

How to join the course

This course is available on FutureLearn: https://www.futurelearn.com/courses/how-is-my-food-made

Partners

The following partners are involved in the project

DIL
EUFIC
University of Reading

Project Lead

Anna-Sophie Stübler
Institution

DIL

Contact details

a.stuebler@dil-ev.de

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