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HPHC - Development and application of hydrocolloids functionalized by dynamic high pressure
HPHC - Development and application of hydrocolloids functionalized by dynamic high pressure

HPHC - Development and application of hydrocolloids functionalized by dynamic high pressure

Improving functionality of hydrocolloids in respect to better texture of food and easier handling in different applications using ultra high pressure

 A new physical method to improve the functionality of selected hydrocolloids with respect to a better texture of food, as well as easier handling in different applications is suggested. This method is based on a continuous treatment by ultra-high pressure homogenization (UHPH) where a liquid is pumped through a narrow valve using high pressures of up to 350 MPa. Structure and conformation of hydrocolloids are modified resulting in different functionality. The aim of the project is to utilize UHPH for physical modification of pectin and oat fibers allowing for the development of new ingredients able e.g. to replace existing animal-based stabilisers like gelatin or health concerning carrageenan, as well as improve stabilisation and quality of oat fibers in food products. Industrial advantage will result in higher sustainability, a broader range of foods, including products for vegans and new food applications.

Ultra High Pressure Homogenisation - UHPH

High-pressure homogenization is a relatively new technology recently introduced by the development of a new generation of homogenizers and new valve design. HPH can be widely applied for physical modification of non-food and food products as well as ingredients, but also for cell disruption of cells in biotechnology or pharmacy for the recovery of intracellular materials.This new generation is capable of attaining pressures 10–15 times higher compared to traditional homogenizers used for example in the dairy industry. The key difference compared to traditional homogenisers is in a new narrow disruption valve design, 5-6 times smaller compared to the valve gap of a traditional homogeniser.

Improving the functionality of hydrocolloids

The project aims to improve pectin and oat fibers functionality by a physical treatment only (requiring no regulatory action) to broaden the application opportunities of pectin and oat, and to provide an efficient and healthier alternative to other hydrocolloids (like gelatin, carrageenan and gum arabica). The selected physical treatment - ultra high pressure homogenization UHPH is known for its capacity to modulate the structure of polymers such as polysaccharides yet in a complex multi-parameter manner.

HPHC Team

DIL German Institute of Food Technologies Technion Herbstreith & Fox Glucanova Maspex ZPOW Agros Nova

Partners

The following partners are involved in the project

DIL
Technion, Israel Institute of Technology
HERBSTREITH & FOX KG
Glucanova
MASPEX

Project Lead

Dr. Kemal Aganovic
Institution

DIL German Institute of Food Technologies

Role

Project leader

Contact details

k.aganovic@dil-ev.de

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